Peachy Old Fashioned

  Posted on   by   No comments

The Old Fashioned cocktail is one of the oldest cocktails around—hence the name—and has had many iterations over the years but basically must have spirits, sugar, bitters and water.  The Old Fashioned we know today, that most manly of drinks beloved of Don Draper, uses American whiskey (usually rye) and comes complete with a wedge of orange and a maraschino cherry.  There is enough room for infinite variation—bourbon or Canadian whiskey, Angostura or Peychaud bitters, fruit or no fruit, lemon instead of orange, etc.  The bitters soaked sugar, which gets muddled before the liquids go in, always reminds me of the bitters soaked sugar cube lying at the bottom of a classic Champagne Cocktail (which as a child always looked like a bouillon cube to me….) and has a certain glamour to it.  Think the Oak Bar at the Plaza Hotel at 6:00 pm in 1972 and you get the idea.

Recently, when presented with a bottle of Leopold Brothers small batch peach flavored whiskey by our friends visiting from Denver (made with peaches grown in the foothills of the Rockies) I thought—this is just the thing to give a new twist to and old cocktail, in this case the Old fashioned.  The beauty of this is that if you cannot get this special small batch Peach whiskey, it works equally well with rye whiskey and peach bitters, which are currently available from Fee Brothers.  The orange and cherry step aside to make room for a slice of summer-ripe peach (or you could even use canned in other seasons) and the whole thing makes for a kinder, gentler take on a hard-hitting classic, as peachy keen as ever a cocktail was.

Peachy Old Fashioned

2 ounces Rocky Mountain Peach Whiskey (or rye)
1 slice Peach
0.25 ounces bitters Angastura, or Fees Peach if using rye or other American whiskey
1 tsp sugar (or one sugar cube)
1 splash(es) soda water

In an old-fashioned glass, muddle sugar, bitters.

Add ice cubes and whiskey. Top up with soda.

Garnish with peach slice.

Categories: Cocktails

Author: Leslie Blythe